Find SchoolsSearch
X

Online Degrees


Full Program Lists


Criminal Justice Careers

Follow Us

Find SchoolsSearch

Forensic Serologist
(found programs from 312 schools)


Welcome to the mostss complete directory on the Web of Forensic Serologist programs. It contains all the nationally accredited programs, from 312 schools across the country.

show all schools

Crimes aren't just solved with witness testimony, investigative work, and confessions. Physical evidence is a major part of finding out what happened at a crime scene and who was responsible for it as you may have seen on Dexter, particularly as DNA technology has progressed over the years. Forensic serologists are some of the most crucial criminal justice professionals in this part of the crime solving process. If this career path sounds interesting to you, use our directory of schools to request information about programs in your area today!


Forensic serology involves looking for, identifying, and studying bodily fluids that may be found at a crime scene, on a victim, or in relation to a crime that's been committed. Safety is of the utmost importance in this job, since you may come in contact with feces, urine, semen, blood, and other potential disease-carrying fluids. Not only must you be well-versed in the identification and handling of different bodily fluids, you must be completely educated in how to safely interact with them without risking disease transmission or destroying evidence.


As a forensic serologist, you may work for many different local police stations, crime labs, and other criminal justice agencies. In addition to working with samples in the lab, your expertise may be needed in the courtroom. Serologists may be summoned to court as expert witnesses.


If you are ready to take on the responsibilities of handling major crime evidence, you can look into earning the necessary qualifications for this challenging field.


Requirements for Becoming a Forensic Serologist

The first step to becoming a working forensic serologist is completing an undergraduate degree in a relevant field. It's clear that this field is highly science-based, with a focus on human biology and chemistry. Different Bachelor's degrees may qualify you for a career in forensic serology, including biology, chemistry, and human biology. These four-year degrees may include courses like Anatomy and Physiology, Pathology, and Organic Chemistry, all of which can help you develop your knowledge of bodily fluids.


Your education may end here, depending on where you want to work. Some police departments and criminal justice agencies, especially those with large case loads or high-exposure cases, may require forensic serologists to have a Master's degree in forensic science or criminal justice. Look for a program with specific courses in DNA analysis, forensic serology, and forensic chemistry. The curriculum for a forensic science program may include classes like Forensic Microscopy, Forensic Serology, Expert Testimony, and Instrumentation in Forensic Chemistry. If your undergraduate degree included lots of lab time and human biology experience, this may take the place of specific forensic training.


When you start at a criminal justice agency or forensic lab, you may need to get trained in the specific lab procedures of that agency. Keep in mind that the sample you receive from a crime scene may well be the only one available; contaminating it or rendering it unfit for analysis can have a devastating impact on an investigation. This is why lab procedures and specimen storage is such an important part of your training.


This career path is not overseen by any licensing or certification agencies. There are optional certification routes that you can look into if you wish, but your education and experience will likely be what potential employers look at. The American Board of Criminalistics is one of the largest optional certification programs in the United States.


Career Outlook and Salary Potential for Forensic Serologist

This industry is seeing faster growth than many other industries. Between 2016 and 2026, the Bureau of Labor Statistics expects job openings for forensic technicians to increase at 17%, which is faster than the national average for other jobs. Crime isn't a field that ever rests, so the need for forensic specialists will likely stay consistent. As DNA analysis techniques become more sophisticated and demand more highly-trained specialists, the nationwide outlook for forensic serologists may continue to increase.


Estimates provided by the BLS indicate that forensic science technicians earn an average salary of $57,850 per year. You must keep cost of living and other factors in mind when considering potential salaries in your area, and salaries for forensic technicians do vary by location. For example, in 2017, Texas forensic technicians claimed an average salary of $52,420. In New York, technicians may earn more, as the average income is $68,510. In the state of California, the BLS notes that forensic science technicians earns an average of $82,650.


What it's Like to Work as a Forensic Serologist

If you're interested in a criminal justice career that does not involve working with the public or even with lots of other people on a daily basis, you may find fulfillment as a forensic serologist. Serologists spend the vast majority of their time in the crime lab, processing bodily fluid samples and studying them for evidence. You may have to inspect fluid samples to see if they have enough volume for testing, run DNA tests on fluids, and see if samples match other DNA or evidence found at crime scenes. From day to day, you may communicate with different investigators, police officers, and lawyers to discuss your findings.


It's extremely important to be self-motivated, able to work independently, and capable of working very carefully. One wrong move may destroy evidence that prosecutors count on to put criminals away. A recent Palm Beach Post report on the retirement of the crime-lab chief shows how important a forensic serologist's work is. Using forensic serology, she was able to solve rapes, homicides, and cold cases.

In many cities, thousands of old rape kits are being used to put rapists behind bars. These samples must be processed and analyzed by trained serologists that can properly process samples that are years old. With your attention to detail and careful work, you can directly contribute to efforts to make your community safer.


Don't wait to learn more about criminal justice programs that can help you become a forensic serologist. Contact the schools in your area today to request more information!

Featured Schools Accepting Students from Across the US:

Online programs may not be available in all areas

Traditional On Campus Programs:

Top >

Alabama

Top >

Arizona

Top >

Arkansas

Top >

California

Top >

Colorado

Top >

Connecticut

Top >

Florida

Top >

Georgia

Top >

Hawaii

Top >

Illinois

Top >

Indiana

Top >

Iowa

Top >

Kansas

Top >

Kentucky

Top >

Maine

Top >

Maryland

Top >

Massachusetts

Top >

Michigan

Top >

Minnesota

Top >

Mississippi

Top >

Missouri

Top >

Montana

Top >

Nebraska

Top >

New Hampshire

Top >

New Jersey

Top >

New York

Top >

North Carolina

Top >

Ohio

Top >

Oklahoma

Top >

Pennsylvania

Top >

Puerto Rico

Top >

Rhode Island

Top >

South Carolina

Top >

South Dakota

Top >

Tennessee

Top >

Texas

Top >

Utah

Top >

Vermont

Top >

Virginia

Top >

Washington

Top >

West Virginia

Top >

Wisconsin

Top >

Wyoming


© 2010-2018 CriminalJusticePrograms.com All rights reserved.